The history of the Wellington Sevens  

New Zealand Sevens World Series event is moving to Hamilton in 2018. Hamilton, claimed from Wellington the hosting rights for the NZ HSBC World Rugby Sevens Series. Hamilton was announced earlier this year as the new host of the event after Wellington's 18-year hosting of the rugby sevens event. So yes Wellington Sevens to become the Hamilton Sevens. Hamilton City is set to host the New Zealand leg of the World Rugby Sevens Series from 3rd – 4th February 2018. With a rich rugby heritage, Hamilton and the wider Waikato region will no doubt come alive with sevens rugby action. Public ticket sales allocation has sold out for the 2018 NZ Sevens.

But here's some of the background history about Wellington Sevens. One of the world's most fun, frantic and downright enjoyable sports tournaments used to take place every year in New Zealand's capital of cool, Wellington. Though it might not be as famous as the World Cup, the Olympics or the Superbowl, there are few tournaments anywhere in the world that can match the Sevens for good vibes, great ambience and a really party atmosphere.

2017 Wellington Sevens was on the 7th February and lasted two days. It should come as no surprise to see the host nation in the familiar position of firm favourites. Since the tournament was founded in 2000, the All Blacks have taken home the top prize on a record six occasions, while taking the runner up spot twice.
They do not, however, come in as champions. That honour belongs to England, who vanquished Sevens-loving Kenya in last year's final and are being tipped by many to meet New Zealand in the ultimate game of this year's contest.
The Wellington Sevens is the fifth event in the IRB Sevens World Series Circuit. The Circuit, which begins in Gold Coast, Australia each October and ends in London England, the following May. In between, it takes in Dubai, Port Elizabeth, Las Vegas, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Glasgow and, of course, Wellington.
Of all these stop overs, Wellington is one of the most famous and fun, with players on the circuit regularly citing it as their favourite place to play. The crowd are there to enjoy themselves, often arriving at the venue in fancy dress. Popular costumes over the years have ranged from Fred Flinstone to George W. Bush to Austin Powers to the Care Bears.
In recent years, kissing has also begun to be a big part of the event. Beginning in 2009 with a ‘Beads for Kisses' campaign, which involved spectators exchanging beads with each other for kisses, and now taking the form of kissing booths around the venue.
The 2017 tournament brought together 16 teams in total: Argentina, Australia, Canada, England, Wales, Figi, France, Kenya, Portugal, Samoa, Scotland, Spain, South Africa, Tonga, USA and, of course, New Zealand. It kicked off in the 35,000 capacity Westpac Stadium in the city centre.

 

Top